March 14 2016

Superstar DJ Seth Troxler's BBQ Obsession

Miami-Standard Sounds
When DJ and BBQ-lover Seth Troxler came to The Standard Spa, Miami Beach for WMC, he got to express his love for food and music at the same damn time. We sat down with Detroit's wunderkind.
THE STANDARD: What is your first memory of mixing good food, family fun, and a grill?
SETH TROXLER: Food has always been a center point for my family. My father comes from a southern Baptist family, and my grandfather and uncle are both preachers. Since I can remember, they gathered every Sunday for a meal after church. The fried chicken I'm making is my grandmother's recipe from those Sundays. 

My mother's father is the source of my BBQ obsession. We were very close and I think since about the age of 7, I was always by his side during his famous BBQs. Our sauce is his signature recipe. 
"Being from the Midwest, kindness and generosity run deep in my moral upbringing."<br>

"Being from the Midwest, kindness and generosity run deep in my moral upbringing."

You said the Troxler family has their own secret barbecue recipe and you are now the holder of that secret. What would you say is your personal add-on to it?
It's actually the other side of my family—the Burtons, my mother's family. It's funny—my mother and I debate who makes the real sauce. She has added a few ingredients to her version of the family sauce, but I think mine is the closest to the original! Keeping my grandfather's memory and legacy alive is deeply important to me, and sharing the incredible flavor of his sauce gives me a lot of pleasure.

DJing and cooking are both about sharing and being generous. Do you agree?
Being from the Midwest, kindness and generosity run deep in my moral upbringing. I'm not sure what my best example of generosity is as its so deeply ingrained in my personality. I've been working closely with this tribe in the Amazon, and I recently donated one of my fees which was enough to build 3 wells at a school. If people just try to be kind and live with generosity in their hearts, we would have a much greater society. 
"Marco Carola once taught me how to make one of my favorite pastas."

"Marco Carola once taught me how to make one of my favorite pastas."

Has a DJ ever taught you something about cooking? 
Actually, Marco Carola once taught me how to make one of my favorite pastas. We were at a hotel in Brazil and he wanted to eat it, but it wasn't on the menu, so he just asked to see the cook and told him what to do. Super simple—you get some cherry tomatoes, onions, and garlic. First, sauté the onions and garlic. Then, add the chopped tomatoes and cook for about 10 minutes. Add a bit of water from the cooking pasta until it thickens, then add a bit of fresh basil and maybe some chili. It's so fresh and easy. I love it!
The next American revolution will be [in Detroit]. I'm nearly sure of it.
Could you share your favorite food-related memory of WMC?
One of the first times I went to WMC, I meet this girl and we had this amazing night together. In the morning, she took me to Versailles for the guava pastries, and then we then went to the beach to watch the waves and make out. Every time I arrive in Miami, the first thing I do is grab one of the pastries. 

Let’s go back to Detroit. Do we have the right to be a bit bored with the Berlin supremacy in the club scene? 
Well, I kind of think Berlin is over. I don't want to be the guy to say he was there, but I was, and it was 10 years ago.

What do you think Detroit needs to have its renaissance?
I think Detroit is well on its way toward a renaissance. What's going to get it there is investment, and people with great ideas. I feel that if all the people who were looking for these hip post-industrial twenty-something lives moved to Detroit rather than Berlin and Brooklyn (both are over) with their parents' money and started cool bars and restaurants, you would see Detroit become the coolest city in America. Each time I visit, I can see it happening. The next American revolution will be there. I'm nearly sure of it.