October 18 2016

Winyl Presents: TSR Airlines' 6 Must-Hear Records

Los Angeles-Standard Sounds
To celebrate the opening of our beautiful new lobby bar at The Standard, Downtown LA, Standard Sounds presents Winyl, every Wednesday night from 6-9pm. We'll be playing albums the way they were intended to be spun, from start to finish, paired with charcuterie and tastings by Silverlake Wines. 

On Wednesday, October 19th, TSR Airlines is getting into the booth. The duo is comprised of LA-based husband and wife Dan and Lindsay 
Mancini, aka DJ Ladypills and DJ Bettie Blue. Hear their six favorite records before they play our DTLA digs. 
Winyl 
Hosted by CC Shefield
Every Wednesday, 6-9pm
The Lobby Lounge at The Standard, Downtown LA
Looking for St. Tropez by Telex 
"A 1970s grand-daddy of tropical tech vibes. Moroder taking Kraftwerk on a Riviera retirement cruise." —Daniel Mancini
Dark West by Danni Bell & the Tarantist 
"One of my new favorite bands is this two-piece outfit from San Diego's Redwoods music. Short wave radio percussion meets a bewitching desert chanteuse. Think Hope Sandoval of Mazzy Star meets trip hop via a World War II radio broadcast." —Daniel Mancini
Songs of Electronic Despair by The Android Sisters 
"Daft Punk's sulky little sisters going through a cutting phase. Like a John Hughes soundtrack sampled by Suicide." —Daniel Mancini
Grievous Angel by Gram Parsons 
"There's something both magical and melancholy about this posthumous release. It's an album to kiss, celebrate, and cry to. It's rumored that Johnny Guitar Watson broke the glass in the faked live recording." —Lindsay Mancini 
Deleted Scenes by Standish Carlyon
"This may be the perfect bedtime record, contrasting elements of dark and uplifting electronica with a heavy soul. It's as if Rimbaud is playing synth." —Daniel Mancini 
Metamodern Sounds in Country Music by Sturgill Simpson
"The description is pretty clear in the album's title. It's country with a cosmic underlay. Check out his cover of "The Promise" by '80s band When in Rome. Simpson strips it slowly to the bones and leaves you wondering (almost three decades later) if his version could possibly be the original. It's that good." —Lindsay Mancini