June 20 2013

The Summer Spreads

Who doesn’t love wading through a stack of the world’s most interesting magazines, with their odd shapes, thick stocks and artfully arranged layouts? In fact, you can do this yourself at any of our Standard Shops in New York, Los Angeles or Miami. Here’s what we’ve enjoyed in the Spring/Summer issues so far...

Women of Letters

'70s (and eternal) icons Angelica Huston and Lauren Hutton share an old paper correspondence about the meaning of art, life and love in CRUSH fanzine.

LAUREN: What is art to you - what makes anything "art"?
ANGELICA: Art stirs us and works on our sense; changes the way we see things. Gives us alternatives and allows us to dream. Growing up in Ireland allowed me to dream. It's a country of poets and musicians; the Irish love to sing and dance and recite poetry - me too. My father was a collector and our house in Co. Calway was filled with paintings and objects. So I had an early relationship with the beautiful, the powerful, and the decorative–

Couch Potato

We've never met a mid-century sunken conversation pit we didn't love. This Argentinian living room in the latest issue of The World of Interiors rocks a very nice floor-to-couch transition.

The Need for Speed

Tyler Palmer is already a veteran race car driver with seven years on the odometer at the handsome age of 19. Wait, did we say handsome? Well, yeah, if you're into the "painfully adorable" type. Hero features the young lad who's graduated to a Porche 944 in the NASA spec championship series. "You have no idea what's it like to press the gas all the way to the floor," he says in Danielle Levitt's video profile. How does he feel about losing a race? "Everybody's gonna have a second place every once in a while." You'll always be first place in our hearts, Ty.

Fruits and Vegetables

I Love You went all out for their Diet Issue...it's chock full of freaky food pictures and answers the question: Can a magazine double as an appetite suppressant? Indeed it can. We did find this spread with Heidi Voet to be quite clever. In "Fruits and Vegetables", Voet keenly places an assortment of fresh veggies in all the right places.

Did you ever wish in high school you were invited over to the popular girl's art-filled Parisian apartment for a sleepover? Neither did we. I Love Fake invites us to the house party no one was ever cool enough to attend. (P.S., pretty sure you are automatically put on the FBI's sex offender registry if you subscribe to this magazine.)

Tabloid Tales

In Du Jour we couldn't get enough of John Connolly's "The History of the National Enquirer," an origin story almost as sensational as its subject's headlines. Here's the turning point when founder and editor Gene Pope went "rag."

"...Then Pope had an epiphany one night in 1957 during a traffic jam. As the car reached the cause of delay –– a violent crash –– he realized that the drivers had all slowed down to get a good look at the carnage. This kicked off the paper's gore stage, which lasted almost a decade. Headlines screamed about one tragedy after another: 'I'm Sorry I Killed My Mother, but I'm Glad I Killed My Father.' Circulation soared and Pope took the newspaper national, changing its name to the _National Enquirer."_


The new, ANEW Magazine peaks inside illustrator Julien d'Y's portfolio. Above you have some sketches for a Vogue cover shoot with Patrick Demarchelier, and a "Sans-Culottes" idea for John Galliano's 2009 Mens' Show. Emphasis on "sans".

Mamma's Boy

Also in ANEW, we spotted this spanky take on Michelangelo's Pietà. Hermanos Santiago's Mamma Pietà, stands a wee 30 centimeters. Wouldn't it be fun to do a full size in marble? We've got just the spot for it..

Blonde Moment

Thom Browne's very colourful Spring/Summer 2013 collection is showcased by Metal Magazine in this blonde-on-blonde spread. When asked what some of his guilty pleasures were, he replied, "Champagne. It's not really guilty." Agreed.

Notes on Erotica

Also in Metal magazine is a lovely interview with artist Malerie Marder who specializes in erotic imagery. She made a very interesting point about inspirations, or, more precisely, what one does with them:

"...Most things inspire - whether they are postivite or negative - they still inspire. The inspiration is easy, it's the execution that is difficult. It's hard to get what's in your head out in the world. Sometimes it's material constraints, money constraints, other times it just doesn't come together how you envisioned it and that can be frustrating. All the myriad dimensions of what is in front of you and what you imagine, inspire."