September 17 2015

A Look Inside Devon Halfnight LeFlufy's S/S '16 Collection

New York-Fashion Week
The Canadian-born Belgian-based designer presented his Spring/Summer 2016 collection at The Standard, High Line in collaboration with Made Fashion Week.
The name Devon Halfnight LeFlufy (!!) first came to the fashion world’s attention when Opening Ceremony snapped up his MFA collection from the Royal Academy of Fine Arts—the Antwerp design school known for producing the “Antwerp Six”—creating a buzz that drew eyes to his second menswear collection last season. After earning a spot on the LVHM Prize’s shortlist earlier this year (no easy feat), LeFlufy had an even more momentum coming into this season, which he parlayed into the debut of his first women’s collection.

Oddly, he only sent six "woman's" looks down the runway, and none that strayed too far from it's male counterpart. While it seems we (finally) live in an age where major department stores have entire floors dedicated to unisex or agender clothing, this was not that. That said, there’s room for his vision to be refined, and he’s got time. A cascading silver earring that read vital was a memorable accessory, paired with a color-blocked tank and white high-waisted pants—perfect for a “Belgian summer” (read: a little cooler).

 Rave-going Matrix man garb (yaaasss) was in full force, with a long black pleather blazer—a first for the designer—over a pair of pleather trousers that featured a patchwork of screenprinted Thunderdome imagery. The look was worn with a poplin jersey t-shirt and finished with a pair of slick custom Dr. Martens.

 An equally beautiful, modern update on the classic Burberry trench, with voluminous tails, was shown with a sparkly silver knit sweater. The perfect blue denim pant with frayed bottoms hit the high ankle and provided a dash of playful energy.

 Overall the collection was fragmented, but what do you expect when the inspiration is just that. LaFlufy explained that his aesthetic is built upon, “The Internet’s uninformed references and the evolutionary (instead of revolutionary) culture movements they create.”

 Well, there you go.